5 Comments

Eileen Kennedy
The creation of resources and communities for sharing good practice is really important. But we also have to do it in a way that very quickly helps people imagine their courses online and gives institutions a realistic idea of what the resource implications will be for different kinds of online learning. Without these things, staff anxieties about what teaching will be like online can become exacerbated when institutions underestimate the time and cost implications for moving online. Even highly motivated staff need to know that they will have enough space in their schedules to do a good job. One of the tools we are working on at the IOE might help with this is CRAM (free to download). It provides a way of modelling the learning benefits and teaching costs of going online before you take the plunge : http://web.lkldev.ioe.ac.uk/cram/index.html
If anyone would like more information about this, let me know.
Eileen Kennedy
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Heather Price
Many thanks for this Eileen. This is certainly something that we would be interested in looking at as part of our forthcoming workshop, and something that I feel compliments the solutions identified by the delegates during the event. I will be contacting you offline to discuss this further.
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Ian Shepherd
I think the missing factor is demand.
The title of the piece was "Why aren't we all learning online?" but it was really about "Why aren't we all teaching online?" Institutions will adopt online learning once they can be convinced that the demand is there and that they will benefit financially by satisfying that demand.
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Heather Price
This is an important point, thanks for raising it Ian. The need for more and better market intelligence about the demand for online learning was raised in the original HEFCE report cited at the start of this blog post and it was also discussed as one of the barriers during the workshop. When considering a curated resource of evidence, this clearly needs to include any research that is available on the demand, financial and competitive benefits that the provision of online learning might be able to bring to an institution.
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Lectora elearning development
There are a lot of elearning development tools available right now in the market, and each one offers a unique function to increase learner engagement and ensure effective, meaningful learning experiences.
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