3 Comments

Graham Wilson
Interesting blog, Allen. Your points apply to any strategic redirection or process change too. In the case of modern technologies there's a difference from the top led ones of the past. Today no-one needs teaching to use them. Manuals aren't required or even provided. Managers, teachers and institutions have to accept that you don't control them - all you can do is embrace and influence. It's a very different mindset.
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paul martin
I disagree with Graham there is clearly a lot of effort required on all sides to master e-learning systems for the wide range of College students. If there are no manuals/support I suggest you buy a better product.
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Neil Stapleton
Good piece Allen.

I think what Graham is referring to Paul are the large numbers of apps and tools that can be very simply adopted, rather that larger IT systems. When was the last time you read a manual for Twitter, Padlet, Socrative etc? For managers I believe it's all about context, how are tools being used, how do they transfer to other contexts within the organisation; other user groups; curriculum areas. Most importantly are there risks, hidden costs, scaling or interoperability issues that the organisation and users need to be aware of. It may not be about control in the old sense, but governance and due diligence is still needed. I is a different mind set... but manager do have point of reference.

It's also about digital literacy and maturity that, a change to a more agile culture that accept the speed of change and minimal bureaucracy.

It may seem simple, but it's a delicate balance, and more difficult to achieve than we may think.
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