Curriculum design is generally understood as a high-level process defining the learning to take place within a specific programme of study, leading to specific unit(s) of credit or qualification. The curriculum design process leads to the production of core programme/module documents such as a course/module description, validation documents, prospectus entry, and course handbook. This process involves consideration of resource allocation, marketing of the course, and learners’ final outcomes and destinations, as well as general learning and teaching approaches and requirements. It could be said to answer the questions ‘What needs to be learned?’, ‘What resources will this require?’, and 'How will this be assessed?'

Institutional approaches to curriculum design

This programme has now completed.  Please see the final synthesis report for the lessons learned, the project pages for the final project stories, and the Design Studio for all project outputs

Curriculum design blog

The aim of the JISC e-Learning programme is to enable UK further and higher education to create a better learning environment for all learners, wherever and however they study. Its vision is of a world where learners, teachers, researchers and wider institutional stakeholders use technology to enhance the overall educational experience by improving flexibility and creativity and by encouraging comprehensive and diverse personal, high quality learning, teaching and research.

What do we mean by curriculum design?

‘Curriculum design’ is generally understood as a high-level process defining the learning to take place within a specific programme of study, leading to specific unit(s) of credit or qualification. The curriculum design process leads to the production of core programme/module documents such as a course/module description, validation documents, prospectus entry, and course handbook. This process involves consideration of resource allocation, marketing of the course, and learners’ final outcomes and destinations, as well as general learning and teaching approaches and requirements. It could be said to answer the questions ‘What needs to be learned?’, ‘What resources will this require?’, and 'How will this be assessed?' 

Managing curriculum changeManaging Curriculum Change

The ‘Managing Curriculum Change’ publication gives an overview of the aims of the Institutional Approaches to Curriculum Design and Transforming Curriculum Delivery programmes alongside a vision for the enhancement of the curriculum design and delivery lifecycle through technology. The publication introduces the projects involved in the programmes and illustrates through a combination of text and graphics what might be achieved at different stages in the curriculum lifecycle, with a focus on who needs to be involved to enable institutional aspirations to become a reality.

Transforming curriculum design - transforming institutions

This briefing paper provides a synthesis of the emerging themes from the programme.

Baselining the institutional processes of curriculum design

Report Synthesis report (Word) (by Helen Beetham, Synthesis Consultant for the Curriculum Design programme) compiled from reports and evidence generated by the 12 projects. Evidence was collated from baseline reports, submitted to the JISC in Sep/Oct 2009, and to a lesser extent from project blogs, websites, presentations, and personal correspondence with the author. To benchmark current practice in institutional systems, which were identified as challenging or ripe for transformation to quality for project funding, project teams have often reported sensitive institutional data. Because of this, baseline evidence is not identified with particular institutions unless specific permission has been given for this.

Update from project interim reports May 2010

This summary attempts to synthesise key findings from the April 2010 interim reports for the Institutional Approaches to Curriculum Design Programme. This report draws out key ‘headlines’ and significant updates since the last set of reports received in October 2009.

Update from project interim reports October 2010

This summary attempts to synthesise key findings from the October 2010 interim reports for the Institutional Approaches to Curriculum Design Programme. This report draws out key ‘headlines’ and significant updates since the last set of reports received in May 2010.

Update from project interim reports April 2011

This summary attempts to synthesise key findings from the April 2011 interim reports for the Institutional Approaches to Curriculum Design Programme. This report draws out key ‘headlines’ and significant updates since the last set of reports received in October 2010.



 

Funded projects

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Summary
Start date
1 September 2008
End date
31 July 2009
Funding programme
e-Learning programme
Topic
Strategic Themes